Russian Sherlock Review: Rock, Paper, Scissors

This post may contain mild spoilers for the second episode of the Russian Holmes series, but should keep most of the surprises intact.

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The second episode of the new Russian Sherlock Holmes series starring Igor Petrenko and Andrey Panin (Watch here. Don’t forget to turn on the English subtitles.) begins in a reliable way for a mystery of any kind–with a corpse. From there, “Rock, Paper, Scissors” is a well-paced, well-written mystery that builds on the relationships established in its predecessor and uncovers layers of character previously unknown.

This character dimensionality is shown in many different ways. Lestrade is still a blustering autocrat, but he’s shown to have a reasonable side. Holmes is socially awkward, but his capacity for genuine affection and grief is highlighted. Mrs. Hudson is a frustrated landlady, but her loyalty is unbreakable. Watson is still the tired, wounded veteran we met at the beginning, but he’s also shown to be extremely brave and confident in his abilities.

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It is Watson whose life takes center stage in this episode, as a mostly canonical depiction of his military past is married to the plot of The Sign of Four. Some significant things have been changed from that story, particularly the Mary Morstan character, but a great deal remains and is made relevant to the viewer by the connection to Watson.

The plot also borrows significantly from both “A Study in Scarlet” and “The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton” and manages to pull off the connection fairly seamlessly. Many canonical characters receive brief mentions, including Watson’s brother and Mycroft Holmes.

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I didn’t necessarily expect this episode to contain a visit from Irene Adler, played by the luminous Lyanka Gryu, but I liked it, because it gave a fleshed-out feel to the world the show is creating and gave us a glimpse of Holmes’s past life. At first, I thought the interaction was straying far afield from the canonical interpretation of the relationship, but it ended up being much closer and cleverer than I expected.

Andrey Panin really shines in “Rock, Paper, Scissors.” His acting, much of it nonverbal, is understated, touching, and, at times, even mesmerizing in its simple poignancy. Petrenko continues to walk the line between genius and awkwardness, giving Holmes an emotional side we rarely see in most other adaptations.

Overall, even though I enjoyed Episode 1 immensely, I thought Episode 2 far outdid it. Without a doubt, it left me wanting more.

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The Detective, The Woman and The Winking Tree: A Novel of Sherlock Holmes is available from all good bookstores and e-bookstores worldwide including in the USA Amazon,Barnes and Noble and Classic Specialities – and in all electronic formats including Amazon Kindle , iTunes(iPad/iPhone) and Kobo.

The Detective and the Woman: A Novel of Sherlock Holmes is available from all good bookstores and e-bookstores worldwide including in the USA Amazon,Barnes and Noble and Classic Specialities – and in all electronic formats including Amazon Kindle , iTunes(iPad/iPhone) and Kobo.

 

Russian Sherlock Review: Baker Street, 221B

This post will contain minor spoilers for the first episode of the new Russian Sherlock Holmes series.

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Once upon a time, there was a classic Russian TV series that starred Vasili Livanov as Sherlock Holmes and Vitali Solomon as John Watson. Much like the Granada series is legendary in the UK and US, this series is respected and venerated in other parts of the world. Fast-forward to 2013, twenty years from the original, and Channel One Russia decided to create a new, Victorian-period, Russian-language adaptation of Sherlock Holmes, this time starring Igor Petrenko as Holmes and Andrey Panin as Watson.

According to Sigita Matulaityte’s review for the Baker Street Babes, The series was never intended to be a direct adaptation of the Holmes canon, so as to avoid re-covering the same exact ground as the classic series. Still, the characters and situations are heavily influenced by the Doyle stories. Currently, the first episode is available on youtube with English-language subtitles. Titled “Baker Street, 221B,” it tells the story of Holmes and Watson’s initial acquaintance.

The most important thing I can do in this review is, I think, to provide cultural context. The series is set in England, but it’s very, very Russian in its situations and interactions. It’s also very Holmesian, but it’s written as if Holmes had been reborn in Russia. In fact, I wish they had gone all the way and set it there, rather than keeping the thin veneer of Englishness, because the characters are so very Russian.

What do I mean? To me, the most significant way this comes out is in the interaction and friendship between Holmes and Watson. I’m tempted to go into a long explanation of high and low context cultural communication, but I’ll try to make it quick. Cultures like those of the US and UK are fairly low context, which means that in relationships, we say a great deal and don’t assume that much. Russia is, in contrast, a high-context culture, meaning that friendship and love is much less about what is said and directly expressed and hugely about what is implied, hinted at, and communicated physically. (Read more about these ideas here.)

Specifically, what this means for the series is that Holmes and Watson form an extraordinarily warm attachment as the episode progresses, but they express it in very different ways than their lower-context counterparts in other adaptations. They say little, but their physical interactions grow closer and closer. They don’t have long conversations about needing each other; they practice boxing together. They don’t define their partnership; they risk their lives for each other without so much as a hesitation; sometimes they even insult each other, but in the fondest of ways. Petrenko and Panin’s dance of ever-increasing friendship is as beautiful and heartwarming as any I’ve seen in a Holmes adaptation, but for the viewer from a far away culture, it requires careful analysis and observation to see signs our culture trains us to miss.

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I found the case itself the hardest thing to follow in the episode. The subtitles were quite good, but there are idioms and sayings in any language that don’t have perfect equivalents, and some of the action confused me a little bit. By the end, however, I understood how everything had come together.

Petrenko is a young Holmes, the age he’s supposed to be when the Doyle canon begins. He first describes himself as a scientist, and that’s an accurate introduction to the character. He’s a softspoken voice with a razor-sharp brain, imbued with the incredible deductive abilities of the original character and an emphasis on Holmes’s social awkwardness. If the character of Sherlock Holmes can be seen as a spectrum, he’s on the Columbo end of it. Panin is a middle-aged Watson, made somewhat frail by a wartime head injury, but extremely capable and protective of Holmes. He puts his physical self on the line a few times in the episode, and he makes his worth obvious to Holmes from the very beginning. The two men form a complement to each other. Watson is a gentle lion, kind in his interactions, but fierce in his loyalty. Holmes is a volatile lamb with an extraordinarily powerful brain and a need for someone to help him interact with the world. It’s a totally equal partnership.

I particularly enjoyed several very traditional scenes in which Holmes makes deductions about people and situations. At those moments, Petrenko’s performance came straight from the pages of the canon. I was less taken with the musical soundtrack, which seemed unable to decide what style it wanted to be.

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Bottom line: Do I recommend this series? Yes, I absolutely do, as long as you understand the cultural context you’re entering.

If you’re fond of Russian literature, even more if you’ve ever seen a play by Chekhov, you’ll have an advantage to understanding where this series is coming from. The characters, the way the plot unfolds, and the nonverbal communication (down to things like the placement of objects and use of personal space) read culturally different from what I’m used to seeing in a show about Holmes and Watson.  I don’t know how else to quantify it except to say that it’s just so Russian, and that’s something I absolutely love, because I believe Sherlock Holmes and John Watson are characters who belong to the whole world.

The greatest characters in literature say something universal about the human experience, and the wonderful thing about Doyle’s creation is that it’s not just about one person–it’s one story of two, the great detective and his Boswell. Their friendship is endlessly fascinating and touching, wherever it’s found, because it speaks to the desire we all share to find friends who will care for and support us, no matter how imperfectly human we may be.

Ultimately, Petrenko and Panin play a Holmes and Watson from a distant culture, whose interactions bear few of the markers I’ve come to expect in adaptations from cultures nearer to mine. And yet, I went away from “Baker Street, 221B” with, most of all, a profound feeling of warmth due to the experience of a beautiful relationship that entirely transcends the limits of a single culture.

I look forward to further episodes and to experiencing the wider world of this new, enjoyable Sherlock Holmes.

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The Detective, The Woman and The Winking Tree: A Novel of Sherlock Holmes is available from all good bookstores and e-bookstores worldwide including in the USA Amazon,Barnes and Noble and Classic Specialities – and in all electronic formats including Amazon Kindle , iTunes(iPad/iPhone) and Kobo.

The Detective and the Woman: A Novel of Sherlock Holmes is available from all good bookstores and e-bookstores worldwide including in the USA Amazon,Barnes and Noble and Classic Specialities – and in all electronic formats including Amazon Kindle , iTunes(iPad/iPhone) and Kobo.